Getting a conservatory can be an amazing addition to your property no matter where you live, giving you extra space within your home and also adding to your properties overall value. A multipurpose space, your options when it comes to what you use your new space for are endless, from extensions of pre-existing kitchens, dining rooms or living rooms, to a whole new study, playroom, sun-room or even a greenhouse.

Or perhaps you already have a conservatory, either previously installed or one that was already attached when you bought the property. Older conservatories can come across a little elderly, especially when it hasn’t had much TLC over the years, and you want to be able to have your conservatory either match or offset both the interior and exterior appearance of your property; so when it comes to design, having a modern twist is really recommended. So, how do you go about it?

There are several different ways you can make your conservatory more modern in both design and functionality:

It is becoming an increasingly popular option to have bi-folding and French doors installed onto your property, opening up a large section of your conservatory out into your garden. Bi-folding doors are a more contemporary option, being able to stretch for the entire wall as a bank of windows, but also being able to fold back in a concertina shape the completely open up your wall and create an unobstructed, low threshold connection between your conservatory and your outdoor space. French doors are the more traditional option, recommended if you simply need a larger door area to be able to fit pushchairs and wheelchairs through for ease of access.

aluminium doors

Often the inside of your conservatory can affect its feel and appearance as much as its structural design and doing a bit of interior decorating can really do wonders. If you are looking for a more traditional or comfy look, getting a fabric sofa and some pile rugs in there can be a great way of encouraging use of the space even in colder weather. If your conservatory gets a lot of sun during the day, however, it is recommended that you put a throw over any soft furnishings to prevent bleaching from the sun. If you don’t want to risk discolouration of furniture, get some rattan furniture instead as it’s plant-based materials don’t lose their colour through exposure to sunlight.

Inside Victorian Conservatory

Up until very recently, conservatories nearly always came with a polycarbonate roof which has been repeatedly proven to have inferior insulation and also not be very hardwearing. A conservatories roof can often make or break its appearance, so, if you are looking to make your new or pre-existing conservatory more modern in design, getting a different roof can really make the world of difference.

aluminium lantern roofsLantern roofs are traditional triangular-shaped roofs that are made out of top-of-the-range double glazing, either with uPVC or aluminium. With slimline frames that maximize the amount of sunlight entering your conservatory, they also provide high-quality insulation as well as security, being able to last against even the toughest weather the UK can throw at it.

If you are looking to make your conservatory feel more of a natural continuation of your property, however, solid and tiled conservatory roofs are a great way of creating a space that seamlessly blends into the rest of your home. These roofs can also be fitted with skylights and rooflights, strategically placed in order to maximize the amount of natural light within your conservatory.

Conservatory walls are predominantly made up of double glazing units, meaning that you have a panoramic view of your garden and outdoor area, and if you have bi-folding or French doors that open out, then you want to be able to look out onto a beautiful outside area. If you have flowerbeds but aren’t much of a gardener, you can easily plant some simple yet effective low-maintenance flowers and small shrubs that only require watering and the occasional weeding. Also, if you really want to open your interior conservatory out into your garden, getting some indoor plants and some floral patterns for your tablecloth or cushions can be a great way of blending their aesthetic together.Conservatory Quote

How much does it cost to replace a conservatory?

If you have an older conservatory that you want replacing completely for a newer, more advanced model, getting a brand-new conservatory typically costs between £5,000 and £16,000; but this does not include the price of if you hire someone to help you demolish and remove your conservatory.

It isn’t recommended that you try and demolish your conservatory yourself as that can pose some serious risks if you don’t know what you are doing. Contact some local builders for quotes if you are looking on having a conservatory demolished, or speak to your new conservatory’s installer.

 

Victorian Conservatory Prices

Conservatory Size (mm) Roof Material Guide Price
3500 x 3500 Polycarbonate £11,000 – £12,500
3500 x 3500 Glass £12,000 – £13,500
3500 x 4000 Polycarbonate £12,000 – £13,500
3500 x 4000 Glass £13,000 – £14,500
4000 x 4000 Polycarbonate £13,000 – £14,500
4000 x 4000 Glass £13,500 – £15,500

Edwardian Conservatory Prices

Conservatory Size (mm) Roof Material Guide Price
3500 x 3500 Polycarbonate £9,000 – £10,500
3500 x 3500 Glass £9,500 – £11,000
3500 x 4000 Polycarbonate £11,500 – £12,500
3500 x 4000 Glass £12,000 – £13,500
4000 x 4000 Polycarbonate £13,500 – £15,000
4000 x 4000 Glass £14,500 – £16,000

Gable Conservatory Prices

Conservatory Size (mm) Roof Material Guide Price
3500 x 3500 Polycarbonate £11,500 – £13,000
3500 x 3500 Glass £12,500 – £14,000
3500 x 4000 Polycarbonate £12,750 – £14,250
3500 x 4000 Glass £13,500 – £15,000
4000 x 4000 Polycarbonate £13,750 – £15,250
4000 x 4000 Glass £14,500 – £16,000

Lean-To Conservatory Prices (Full Build Dwarf Wall)

Conservatory Size (mm) Roof Material Guide Price
3500 x 2000 Polycarbonate £7,000 – £8,000
3500 x 2000 Glass £7,500 – £8,500
3500 x 2500 Polycarbonate £8,000 – £9,500
3500 x 2500 Glass £8,500 – £10,000
4000 x 2000 Polycarbonate £7,500 – £9,000
4000 x 2000 Glass £8,000 – £9,500
4000 x 2500 Polycarbonate £9,000 – £10,000
4000 x 2500 Glass £9,500 – £10,500

P-Shaped Conservatory Prices

Conservatory Size (mm) Roof Material Guide Price
5000 x 3000 Polycarbonate £12,500 – £14,000
3500 x 3000 Glass £13,000 – £14,750
5000 x 3500 Polycarbonate £13,500 – £15,000
5000 x 3500 Glass £14,000 – £15,500
5000 x 4000 Polycarbonate £14,250 – £15,750
5000 x 4000 Glass £15,000 – £16,500

T-Shaped Conservatory Costs

Conservatory Size (mm) Roof Material Guide Price
5000 x 3000 Polycarbonate £12,500 – £14,000
3500 x 3000 Glass £13,000 – £14,750
5000 x 3500 Polycarbonate £13,500 – £15,000
5000 x 3500 Glass £14,000 – £15,500
5000 x 4000 Polycarbonate £14,250 – £15,750
5000 x 4000 Glass £15,000 – £16,500

conservatory

Can you use a conservatory all year round?

If your conservatory gets too cold during the winter and too hot during the summer, it can be a sign that your double glazing is underperforming, letting heat escape and cold air get inside. If you think this is the case, replacing them with some brand new double or triple glazing, as well as new uPVC or aluminium frames, can mean that you can enjoy your living space all year round, save you a lot of money in heating bills and decrease your carbon footprint.

 

How much does it cost to replace a conservatory?

If you have an older conservatory that you want replacing completely for a newer, more advanced model, getting a brand-new conservatory typically costs between £5,000 and £16,000; but this does not include the price of if you hire someone to help you demolish and remove your conservatory.

It isn’t recommended that you try and demolish your conservatory yourself as that can pose some serious risks if you don’t know what you are doing. Contact some local builders for quotes if you are looking on having a conservatory demolished, or speak to your new conservatory’s installer.

Gable Conservatories

How long should a conservatory last?

A typical uPVC conservatory has a lifespan of around 25 – 30 years, with minimal upkeep; however, the lifespan of a conservatory can often depend on the quality of its installation. A conservatory put together poorly often has a much shorter life expectancy, needing to have additional refurbishments over the years which can cost you a lot more money than you were intending to spend.

To prevent this, it is important that you check that your chosen installers are reputable by checking both their customer reviews and whether or not they are accredited by consumer rights charities such as Which? and FENSA.

 

How can I make my conservatory warmer?

As mentioned above, if your conservatory is often too cold to be able to sit in, it can be a sign that your double glazing is underperforming. Getting some brand new uPVC or aluminium windows for your conservatory can massively improve the thermal performance of your property, with the benefits of advancements in double glazing technology being able to create a warm space that you can use all year round.

If you are interested in getting a conservatory installed on your property, why not use our free online Double Glazing Cost Calculator to get competitive quotes from reputable local installation companies. If you have any questions about any of our services or products, don’t hesitate to contact us.